A core element of Hanns R. Neumann Stiftung’s (HRNS) activities is working towards improved livelihood prospects for rural smallholder farming families. With a holistic approach, HRNS looks at rural farming systems and landscapes focusing on coffee growing regions. Since 2001, our work across 18 countries has brought about lasting change for over 300,000 producers of agricultural crops such as coffee. Today, we continue to empower smallholder farming families in Guatemala, Brazil, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania and Indonesia and anticipate that we will directly reach an additional 100,000 families in these focus countries by 2023.

Our vision of change: Smallholder families prosper, and youth are drivers for thriving communities in coffee regions.

Our Theory of Change (ToC) outlines the five key focus areas of HRNS’ work: family business, farmer organizations, youth, climate change and gender as a crosscutting component. All areas are interlinked and work together to support smallholder families as a whole. Click the link below to read HRNS’ ToC and learn more!

Download HRNS’ Theory of Change!

Our approach combines the development of advanced agricultural practices, appropriate farm and household management strategies, adaptation to climate change, and member-oriented farmer organizations. Gender equality, inter-generational dialogue and skills development for young people are vital in all our activities. We support the farming community to advocate for their needs and promote entrepreneurship, respect, and integrity as values of decision-taking. As a result, smallholder families are driving prosperous development of their livelihoods for themselves and their communities.

– HRNS Theory of Change

HRNS aspires to work with like-minded private and public partners that share similar values and address complementary issues. We have a growing network of public and private partners, and a proven track record of successful interventions. To collaborate and reach more people together, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

Get in touch with us!

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